A new yoga experience that blends

yoga with doom & heavy metal music

for the dark and adventurous souls

 
 
 

Black Widow Yoga is an independently-run yoga concept by Salem, MA yoga teacher Tina, that uses metal music in classes instead of traditional yoga music. Inspired by other non-traditional yoga classes such as Metal Yoga Bones in Brooklyn, NY, Black Widow Yoga aims to challenge your understanding of what yoga means to each individual, and to encourage every outsider to harness the energy within that truly connects to doomy and dark music.

About Tina

From the Peabody Essex Museum article written by Paige Besse:

"For some time, Tina Moroney taught your usual relaxing yoga classes, but life has a way of pulling the mat out from under you. The utter heartbreak and depression she experienced through her father’s diagnosis, battle, and ultimate passing from cancer, would forever change the course of her career. As she was trying to fight her demons through yoga, Tina came to a striking realization. The yoga music she was hearing was not an honest way for her to practice. 'It was not accurate depiction of what I felt when I was doing yoga or why I was doing yoga,' she says. The deep, yet brooding and meditative tones in metal were a better fit, helping her to face the storm head on, which was much healthier, and proved that beautiful things can come from the darkest of places....

In a Black Widow Yoga session there is screaming and swearing. It is raw and genuine. Tina explains, 'That’s why I teach yoga, like anyone else, it’s to be mindful and honest.' Channeling Metallica’s lyrics from 'Wherever I May Roam' with a 'free to speak my mind anywhere, and I'll redefine anywhere' attitude, a Black Widow Yoga class brings the aura of yoga back down to earth.

Tina accepts that darkness is a part of her, and proudly wears it on her sleeve. 'I am not afraid to admit that I have skeletons in my closet,' says Tina, 'everyone has them.' And that is exactly why this is not meant to be a cookie-cutter yoga class. It indulges that clandestine side, breaks misconceptions and affords everyone the opportunity to admit that 'it’s okay to be dark.'”